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KSCO Newsletter

Jim Parrack Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 19th March 8-9 PM

 

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be featuring an interview at the Cinequest Film Festival 2016 with actor Jim Parrack. Known for his starring roles in the series True Blood and in the military science fiction war film Battle: Los Angeles, Jim’s screen debut was in the 2008 drama film Annapolis. He made multiple guest appearances on TV shows such as Monk, Grey’s Anatomy, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and Criminal Minds before his role as Hoyt Fortenberry in the HBO series True Blood, in which he was one of the main starring cast for six seasons. In 2013, Jim starred in the drama film Child of God and the Spanish-American drama A Night In Old Mexico. He co-stars in the film Fury (2014); The Adderall Diaries (2016) with James Franco, Ed Harris, Amber Heard, and Christian Slater; and the soon-to-be released Suicide Squad. In 2014, Jim joined the Broadway cast of Of Mice and Men, playing the role of Slim. After studying at Playhouse West Los Angeles for 10 years and teaching there for four years, Jim moved to new York in 2014 to start the acting school Playhouse West Brooklyn Lab, of which he is the director. Playhouse West Brooklyn Lab is built on simple principles of hard work, respect, passion and service, and offers a 2-year program of study for the serious actor.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of Jim Parrack. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

‘Should We Have a Ratings System For Films?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 12th March

This Saturday 12th March 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance we are featuring Out And About - thought-provoking conversations on the street. We consider ‘Should We Have a Ratings System For Films?’ According to the US Classification and Rating Administration “Movie ratings provide parents with advance information about the content of movies to help them determine what movies are appropriate for their children at any age.” Are movie ratings necessary? And if so, do they achieve what they set out to accomplish? Other countries have more categories of ratings; the UK for example has U (universal, suitable for children 4 or older), PG (should not unsettle a child 8 or older), 12, 12A (must be accompanied by an adult), 15 (no one under 15), 18 (no one under 18), R18 (basically pornography, can only be shown at special cinemas or sold in sex shops). There is a big developmental difference between 13 and 18. With no rating between PG13 and R in America, are younger teens possibly seeing content they shouldn’t? Or conversely are older teens being shielded from content that could be appropriate for them? Would it be useful to have more ratings categories in America or are broad categories good enough? In the US, young children can see PG-13 and R-rated films if accompanied by their parents, unlike in other countries where the age ratings are strictly enforced. Should we aim to protect children from irresponsible adults by having enforced age ratings or is this interfering too much? Sex is censored much more strictly than violence in US cinema. What does this say about our society? With extreme sexual and violent content readily available on the internet are film ratings obsolete or do they still have a place to guide and inform?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com 

Mary Kiio and Liz Miller Special Guests on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 5th March 8-9 PM

This week as her special guests from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing two of the directors of the documentary Hands On - award-winning film-maker Liz Miller in Montreal and first-time director Mary Kiio in Kenya. A collaborative project of the International Association of Women In Radio and Television (IAWRT), Hands On profiles five women from four continents tackling climate change through policy, protest, education and innovation. Hands On was broadcast on television in India and Kenya and screened at the climate talks in Paris.

If you are interested in Film be sure to check out the Cinequest Film Festival running March 1-13 in San Jose with over 129 films from all over the world (www.cinequest.org). I’ll be there, so hope to see you!

Film-maker Liz Miller is a professor in Communication Studies at Concordia University in Montreal and an award winning documentary maker whose films and transmedia projects offer new and critical perspectives on gender, social movements and media. Her films, web initiatives, and media campaigns on such issues as water privatization, gender violence, and immigration have won numerous awards and been used in educational curricula around the world. Liz Miller teaches courses in media production, the politics of food and film, methods in research-creation, Latin American Film and more, and having lived in Central and South America collaborates with groups in the region providing training to human rights, labor, and women’s organizations in media production, digital storytelling, and media advocacy campaigns. Liz Miller is a board member of Cinema Politica and is an active member of the International Association of Women In Radio and Television (IAWRT) having served on the board for six years.
First-time director Mary Kiio from Kenya is committed to telling stories on democracy and governance issues to keep citizens informed on the change they can bring to their society. She is the Founder and Lead Consultant at Roshani Consultancy Services and is a broadcast media professional with 15 years experience working in and with various media houses and media development organizations. Mary Kiio is a trainer, facilitator, moderator and mentor with extensive experience in the areas of Online Safety for women, Conflict Sensitive Journalism, Democracy and Governance issues, Election Reporting, health journalism, Humanitarian media and disaster management, Road Safety, and Child Rights. Mary Kiio is also a freelance journalist and has authored a children's book.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of Mary Kiio and Liz Miller. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

‘Spirituality and Religion: What’s the Difference?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 27th February

This Saturday 27th February 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance we are featuring Out And About - thought-provoking conversations on the street. We consider ‘Spirituality and Religion: What’s the Difference?’

Point of View for the BBC says one in three Americans define themselves as spiritual but not religious. American sociologists Robert Putnam and David Campbell talk about "Nones" - people who belong to no religion but still believe in God. The Pew Research Religious Landscape Survey analysis in 2015 states “the number of religiously unaffiliated adults has increased by roughly 19 million since 2007. There are now approximately 56 million religiously unaffiliated adults in the U.S”. Yet “The share of U.S. adults who say they believe in God…[is] still remarkably high by comparison with other advanced industrial countries…at 89% and roughly six-in-ten adults now say they feel a deep sense of spiritual peace and well-being at least once a week, up 7 percentage points since 2007…and 46% of adults say they feel a deep sense of wonder about the universe on a weekly basis, also up sharply since 2007.” What is the difference between spirituality and religion? How do you define spirituality? Why is religious affiliation declining? The Pew survey found that about half of U.S. adults express reservations about the conduct of religious institutions, saying they are too concerned with money, power, and rules, and too involved with politics. Perhaps this could this be an explanation of the decline in religious affiliation even though most Americans agree that religious organisations perform positive functions in society. There are so many different religions and versions of each religion, might promoting spirituality over religion be helpful to break down barriers and connect people?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

Kristopher Jansma Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 20th February 8-9 PM

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Kristopher Jansma - award-winning, best-selling author. If you enjoy the interview, you can meet him in person at Bookshop Santa Cruz on February 24th at 7PM. Kristopher’s first novel The Unchangeable spots of Leopards published by Viking/Penguin in 2013 was critically acclaimed and a success with readers. Described as “F. Scott Fitzgerald meets Wes Anderson" by The Village Voice and a “canny, seductive, and utterly transfixing tale about the magic of storytelling and the misery of writing” by Donna Seaman of Booklist, Kristopher’s inventive and witty debut describes a young man’s quest to become a writer and the misadventures in life and love that take him around the world. The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards was an Honorable Mention for the PEN/Hemingway Prize, a finalist for the Prix de l’Inapperçu, and longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Award for Excellence in Fiction and the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize. It was a Barnes & Noble Discover Pick, an ABA “Indie Next” Choice, an ALA Notable Book, and an Alternate Selection for the Book of the Month Club. The novel has also been translated into German, French, Italian, Dutch, Czech and Turkish. Growing up in Lincroft, New Jersey, Kristopher received his B.A. in The Writing Seminars from Johns Hopkins University and an M.F.A. in Fiction from Columbia University. He has written a column for Electric Literature about Literary Artifacts, and loving books in a digital age and his work has also been published in The New York Times, Columbia Magazine,The Believer, Slice Magazine, the Blue Mesa Review, and on The Millions.
Kristopher is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at SUNY New Paltz College and is the winner of the 2014 Sherwood Anderson Fiction Award. Kristopher’s second novel Why We Came To The City has just come out and is described by Publisher’s weekly as “a tightly written, smartly conceived story that puts an insightful spin on life in the Big Apple”.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of Kristopher Jansma. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

This Saturday 16th January 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance we are featuring Out And About - thought-provoking conversations on the street. We consider ‘Should Machines Do Everything For Us?’

Why do we seem to want everything done for us? And what will happen when it is? From the advent of labour-saving devices which simplified cooking, cleaning, and washing, we have moved towards increasing automation of tasks through technology. It is customary for businesses’ phones to be answered by automated voice systems, manufacturing has been streamlined replacing workers with machines, and computers complete all sorts of tasks that used to be done with brain power. There is talk of creating sex robots for those unfortunates who can’t find relationships, and war robots to eliminate casualties for the countries who can afford to martial robot armies. On a lighter note, with the internet of things, soon we will have the choice to have fridges that tell us when we are running out of milk or heating systems that manage our environment for us without us having to consider if we are cold hot or cold. For years it’s been possible to have electric curtains and remote controlled sound and lighting; even the humble remote control has changed life by eliminating the need for us to get up out of our chair to make entertainment choices. The future holds out the prospect of driver-less cars and many other ways in which we can basically sit back and have everything done for us. Why is this desirable? One of the prime reasons given for using machines is to do jobs that humans don’t want to do and thus free up leisure time. Is free time the ultimate ‘win’ in our society? Or if we gain leisure at the expense of using the full capacity of our bodies and minds are we degrading human experience? It is easier perhaps to understand the impetus to eliminate boring or unpleasant tasks so that more people can have meaningful and fulfilling work but what about using machines for things that people want to do? For example, a software is being developed for game designers that will create music for them to accompany the game. Why are we replacing humans in jobs that would be fulfilling for them, such as composing music? Do we need to learn that just because we can do something doesn’t necessarily mean that we should? Where is the end-point? How much of your life do you want controlled for you? If we abdicate too many mental and physical tasks to machines could we end up in a Wall-E world of atrophied bodies and brains, or is it the logical way to create a wonderful utopia?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com