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‘Does it Have To Be Them and Us?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 14th May

 

This Saturday 14th May 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance we are featuring Out And About - thought-provoking conversations on the street. We consider ‘Does it Have To Be Them and Us?’

There’s lots of ways we can find ourselves thinking in terms of ‘them and us’ - young and old, rich and poor, healthy versus not taking care of oneself, right-wing versus liberal, gay and straight, black and white, first-world and third world. Do you ever find yourself feeling very different from a certain group of people? How does that make you feel? When you feel passionate about an issue how do you feel about those who disagree with you - do you see it as two sides, a wrong and a right? Or simply as a variety of views or beliefs?

In an article by Robert W Peck of the Constitution Party he comments “In a world with an “us versus them” mentality, it’s always “them” that are the problem… right? We’re never the cause of our own troubles, that would be unthinkable. It’s always the other guy who fouls everything up….The same phenomenon exists in the political arena where the “us versus them” mentality finds that it is always the other political party that is the problem. You name the trouble, the other party caused it. If only the country were turned over to our side, to our favored “ism” or political party, we would make it a utopian paradise.” In the political arena are you finding yourself feeling a sense of them and us?

Joseph Joubert said that “The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress”. I’m wondering if this is part of what gets lost when we get into a ‘them and us’ mindset - it seems we become more focused on converting others to our belief system than concentrating our energy on how actual progress could be affected. Is this something you see at all? Does it have to be them and us?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

 

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Oscar-Winning Director of ‘Eye In The Sky’ and Cinequest Award-Winning Film-Makers from ‘Dependent’s Day’ Special Guests on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 7th May 8-9 PM

This week as her special guests from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Academy-Award-winning director Gavin Hood about new film Eye In The Sky, and screenwriter and film-maker Michael David Lynch, and actor and filmmaker Joe Burke, about their new film Dependent’s Day.

Gavin Hood is a filmmaker, screenwriter, director and actor best known for writing and directing Tsotsi (2005), which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, and for directing X-Men Origins: Wolverine, and Ender’s Game. Written by Guy Hibbert, Eye In The Sky stars Helen Mirren and Alan Rickman and explores the moral, political, and personal implications of modern warfare.

Michael David Lynch makes his long awaited feature film directorial debut with Dependent’s Day, having previously worked on films such as Inception, Die Hard 4, Ironman 2 and Transformers 2 and producing several successful films including Drop, Between Us, and This Thing with Sarah. Dependent’s Day recently won the Audience Award Narrative Feature Comedy at the Cinequest film festival 2016. Michael studied film at Columbia College, Chicago.

Joe Burke is a filmmaker and actor who received his MFA from th American Film Institute. He earned his BA degree in Film and a minor in Theater from Columbia College. Burke has acted in several national commercials and has appeared on the critically acclaimed Showtime show Ray Donovan, and the popular Disney show Dog With A Blog. Recently Joe is starring in the Screen Junkies Interns of F.I.E.L.D. a parody on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Known for playing a witty, quirky character, Joe embodies Dependent’s Day’s protagonist Cam, and his eternal struggle to claim his manhood.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of these talented film-makers. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Rita Moreno and Steve Goldbloom Special Guests on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 30th April 8-9 PM

This week as her special guests from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Oscar-winning actress Rita Moreno and Steve Goldbloom, the director of Rita’s latest award-winning film, Remember Me.
Legendary performer Rita Moreno is one of only 12 people who have received an Oscar, Grammy, Tony, and Emmy award. She received the Oscar for West Side Story in 1961 and is still going strong at 84, starring in the new comedy film Remember Me, which had its world premiere at the Cinequest Film Festival 2016 in Silicon Valley. She remains one of the busiest stars in show business working in TV, film, and theatre. Her first book, Rita Moreno: A Memoir, published by Celebra Books, instantly became a New York Times Bestseller.
Steve Goldbloom is a writer, producer, and performer based in Los Angeles. In 2014, he created and hosted the PBS series Everything But The News, which lampooned Silicon Valley and public broadcasting. The show earned critical acclaim and was ranked best digital series by USA Today in its first year. In February 2016, Steve launched a new sketch series as writer/performer with AOL entitled On The Brink Of Greatness. Steve's directorial work includes creating the series Brief But Spectacular - a weekly interview series for PBS NewsHour. Steve runs his production company Second Peninsula LLC out of Los Angeles. Remember Me, starring Rita Moreno, is Steve's feature film debut.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of Rita Moreno and Steve Goldbloom. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 23rd April 8-9 PM

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, multi-award-winning and bestselling author, poet, activist and teacher of writing. If you enjoy the interview, you can meet Chitra in person on April 28th at 7PM at Bookshop Santa Cruz.

Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni writes for children as well as adults and has published novels in multiple genres, including realistic fiction, historical fiction, magical realism, and fantasy. Her themes include the Indian experience, contemporary America, women, immigration, history, myth, and the joys and challenges of living in a multicultural world. Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni’s work has been published in over 50 magazines, including the Atlantic Monthly and The New Yorker, and her writing has been included in over 50 anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories, the O.Henry Prize Stories and the Pushcart Prize Anthology. Chitra’s books have been translated into 29 languages and many of them have been used for campus-wide and city-wide reads. Her novels include The Mistress of Spices, Sister of My Heart, The Palace of Illusions and Oleander Girl. Several of her works have been made into films, all of which have won awards. Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni’s latest book is Before We Visit The Goddess.

Tune in Saturday 23rd April 8-9 PM to find out more about the life and art of Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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‘How Much Is Enough?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 16th April

 

This Saturday 16th April 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance we are featuring Out And About - thought-provoking conversations on the street. We consider ‘How Much Is Enough?’ In ancient ethics, there was much discussion about the link between virtue of character and happiness. Aristotle believed that to live the good life, or to flourish as a human, that predominantly we had to have and exhibit virtue, although he also thought health, wealth and beauty factored in to human flourishing. What represents quality of life for you? What constitutes ‘the good life’?

Economics journalist Ryan Avent states in 1843 magazine that economist John Maynard Keynes mused in 1930 that a century hence society might be so rich that work hours would be cut to 10-15 hours a week. Keynes postulated “For the first time since his creation man will be faced with his real, his permanent problem - how to use his freedom from pressing economic cares, how to occupy the leisure, which science and compound interest will have won for him, to live wisely and agreeably and well”. Marx did not think endless leisure desirable, he believed that being occupied by good work was living well. We have not ended up working less. Capitalism requires an endless expansion of wants, so although it has generated great wealth, we may be caught in an insatiability trap, never quite reaching the good life. Do you feel acquiring material goods has become an end in itself? To what degree do you equate happiness with money? How much of an influence do you think the beliefs or behaviours of those around us have on our feelings about wealth and how much we want to acquire? How much is enough?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Cinequest Award-winning Film-makers from Nila and My Feral Heart Special Guests on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 9th April 8-9 PM

 

This week as her special guests from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be featuring cast and film-makers of the award-winning films Nila and My Feral Heart. Nila won Best First Film and My Feral Heart won Best Drama in the Cinequest 2016 Audience Awards. 

Nila is a mood-piece set in Bombay about a taxi driver who fatefully comes across his childhood crush whilst driving at night in the city. The atmospheric film explores how someone responds when the truth is elusive and love seems inexplicably unrequited. Ruth talks to the Indian writer and director of the film Selvamani Selvaraj. 
My Feral Heart is the story of an independent, young man, Luke, who is the caretaker of his mother. When she dies he is put in a care home as he has Down’s Syndrome. He struggles to settle there with his wings clipped. Gradually, he makes friends with one of the carers and a young gardener, but it is his discovery of a wild, injured girl that changes his life. The film explores whether we are not so different from each other as we may think. Ruth talks to the British director Jane Gull, producer James Rumsey, and cast members Pixie Le Knot, who plays the young girl, and Stephen Brandon who plays Luke.

Tune in Saturday 8-9 PM to find out more about these wonderful film-makers and actors. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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