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‘Must Women Be Like Men To Be Equal?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 29th August

This Saturday 29th August 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland we consider ‘Must Women Be Like Men To Be Equal?’ Women want to be treated equally to men, to have equal opportunities, and to have freedom to choose what occupations they can pursue. However, there seems to have grown up around the idea of equality the premise that to be equal to men, women have to enter the men’s world, to demonstrate they can be as tough as men and match other masculine traits rather than feminine qualities and skills coming to be valued equally. For instance, the act of caring for and rearing children and home-making (always undervalued compared with traditional male pursuits) seems to have fallen even lower in value when compared with other more traditionally masculine occupations. Must women be like men to be equal? Or is a situation possible where caring and nurturing and other more traditionally feminine skills are valued equally? Does your view of equality allow for men and women to be different but equal?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Raven Wilkinson Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 29 August 9-10 PM

 

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Raven Wilkinson, ballet dancer and actress. Raven was the first black female dancer to be hired to dance full-time in a major ballet company in America. Born in Harlem, New York, Raven began studying ballet at the age of nine studying under Vecheslav and Maria Swoboda, both Moscow Bolshoi Theatre-trained ballet dancers. She also took technique classes at the Ballet Theatre school with Madame Shollar from the St. Petersburg Imperial Russian Ballet. Raven went on to dance for five years with the renowned Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in the corps and as a soloist in Les Sylphides, only leaving when racial prejudice and segregation made it impossible for her to perform in certain Southern American states preventing her from touring fully with the company. After leaving Ballet Russe, Raven auditioned for several ballet companies without success and didn’t dance for several years. Then in 1966, the famous ballet dancer Sylvester Campbell suggested that Raven come and dance with him in The Netherlands with the Dutch National Ballet. Raven was offered a soloist contract and went on to dance with the company for seven years performing soloist roles in Symphony in C, La Valse, The Snow Maidens, and Graduation Ball. Lois Bewley, a dancer with Ballets Russes, American Ballet Theatre, and New York City Ballet, has said that “Of all the dancers I have ever known Raven is one of the most beautiful.” And Arthur Mitchell, principal dancer at New York City Ballet and founder of Dance Theatre Harlem has said of seeing Raven dance she had “beautiful feet” and was “quite lyrical”. Raven retired from ballet in 1973 but went on to perform character roles with the New York City Opera. Raven’s career has inspired many ballet dancers of colour, including the first African-American performer to be appointed as a principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre, Misty Copeland, for whom Raven has been a mentor. 

Tune in Saturday 9-10 PM to find out more about the life and art of Raven Wilkinson. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Sadia Azmat Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 22nd August 9-10 PM

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing British stand-up comedian and comedy writer Sadia Azmat. Born in Essex, England, Sadia started writing and performing comedy professionally after a chance encounter in a call centre helped her to discover her mentor, professional comedian and author Deborah Frances-White, who introduced Sadia to the UK comedy circuit. Within two weeks of meeting Deborah, Sadia found herself performing to an audience of 80 and hasn’t looked back. Sadia’s debut called ‘Please Hold - You’re being transferred to a UK based Asian Representative’, directed by Deborah Frances-White, was featured on the BBC Radio Show Front Row and performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Not long after, Sadia was shortlisted for the Funny Women Awards Final in London. Her debut full-length show ‘I Am Not Malala’ played at the Edinburgh Fringe and led to Sadia being featured on British Muslim TV’s Sister’s Hour. Sadia has appeared on the BBC World Service and has written a short for BBC Comedy Short, which features top British comedy talent. Known for her forthright observational comedy about her experiences as a British Muslim woman and also cross-cultural issues about race and religion Sadia has appeared at comedy clubs and festivals around Britain, as well as contributing writing to British newspapers.

Tune in Saturday 9-10 PM to find out more about the life and art of Sadia Azmat. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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‘Are We Medicalising Normal?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 22nd August

This Saturday 22nd August 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland we consider ‘Are We Medicalising Normal?’ Drapetomania was a supposed mental illness described by American physician Samuel A. Cartwright in 1851 that caused black slaves to flee captivity. His feeling was that with "proper medical advice, strictly followed, this troublesome practice that many Negroes have of running away can be almost entirely prevented." Whilst this sounds preposterous to us now psychotherapist Gary Greenberg feels that the disorder might well have made it into the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) had it existed at the time, noting that homosexuality was listed in the DSM as a sociopathic personality disorder until 1973. Greenberg says that by trying to use a pseudoscientific model to understand and treat our “hopelessly complex” inner world, we are creating a “charade” of non-existent disorders. Obviously there is a need to help people with serious mental issues that are impeding their life and/or causing harm to others. But excluding these cases, there are a whole range of “disorders” that have sprung up that represent behaviour that used to be absorbed into normal life. In his book The Book of Woe: The DSM and the unmaking of Psychiatry, psychotherapist of 30 years Gary Greenberg states “When the DSM was [first] published there were 14 mental disorders and now there are 250 – it needs to scale back.” Do you have any sense of the medicalisation of everyday human experience? Are you aware of more children being diagnosed with mental conditions? Are we medicalising normal?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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Felicia Day Special Guest on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland Saturday 15th August 9-10 PM

This week as her special guest from the arts Ruth Copland is pleased to be interviewing Felicia Day, award-winning actress, web entertainment entrepreneur, writer, songwriter, producer, and director. Felicia has carved a unique place for herself and her talents both in the traditional entertainment realm and online. If you enjoy the interview you can meet Felicia in person at Bookshop Santa Cruz on August 22nd at 7 PM. 

An early adopter of all things internet Felicia has written, produced, directed and starred in many shows in the web video world including The Guild, which was a huge hit running to six series and has won numerous awards for web video excellence. Amongst other web projects, Felicia has co-starred in Joss Whedon’s multi-award-winning Internet musical “Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog,” and her production company Knights of Good has produced the innovative web series “Dragon Age” in conjunction with EA/Bioware. In 2012 Felicia launched Geek & Sundry, a funded Youtube channel which aimed to be the epicenter of gaming and lifestyle for pop culture fans with an independent spirit. The channel has many highly acclaimed shows and has garnered over one million subscribers and over 200 million views since its launch. In 2014, the company was sold to Legendary Entertainment. Felicia continues to work as creative chief officer of her company, as well as develop television and web projects for her to write, produce and star in. In addition to acting online, Felicia has appeared as an actor in many beloved roles in film and TV including in Supernatural, Eureka, Buffy The Vampire Slayer, and Red Werewolf Hunter. She was a member of the board of directors of the International Academy of Web Television from 2009-2012. Born in Alabama, Felicia had an unconventional upbringing and schooling and began college at 16 attending the University of Texas at Austin on a full scholarship in violin performance. She double majored in mathematics and music performance, and graduated at the age of 19 in the top 4% of her class. Her life and remarkable career is showcased with humour and insight in her newly published memoir You’re Never Weird On The Internet (Almost).

Tune in Saturday 9-10 PM to find out more about the life and art of Felicia Day. For more info and to hear previous shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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‘Should Minors Ever Be Tried As Adults?’ It’s A Question Of Balance 8-9 PM Saturday 15th August 2015

This Saturday 15th August 8-9 PM on It’s A Question Of Balance with Ruth Copland we consider ‘Should Minors Ever Be Tried As Adults?’ Critics of juvenile court argue that the line between juvenile and adult is no longer as clear, that children grow up much quicker these days, and they are more exposed to adult ideas and so they can be responsible for their actions. Barry Krisberg, a University of California, Berkeley criminologist states that there is no way a minor can fully understand what they are doing saying “he might be able to recount the events that resulted, but the notion that he comprehended the consequences of his actions flies in the face of all the science we know.” Scientific research has shown the pre-frontal lobe development is not complete until the early 20s. Teens may have difficulty inhibiting inappropriate behaviors because the circuitry needed for such control is not fully mature. This is something that is frequently put forward as an argument as to why the legal age to consume alcohol should not be lowered. Critics of the juvenile court system state that it is not being successful enough at deterring juvenile crime and this is an argument for a more punitive approach in the criminal courts. Concerns about justice being done for juveniles being tried as adults revolves around whether they can adequately comprehend their Miranda Rights, and the complexities of the legal process, research showing that when tried as an adult juveniles are more likely to waive the right to an attorney and to confess during police interrogations; misunderstand that they have the right to an attorney before and during a police interrogation; and erroneously believe that attorneys only serve innocent defendants. So should minors ever be tried as adults?

What do you think? Ruth Copland gets the views of people on the street for our Out and About feature. Join us on Saturday 8-9 PM! For more info on the show and to hear past shows visit www.itsaquestionofbalance.com

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