Local News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Show Talk

  • Is There A War On Men?

    On November 30th, on KSCO Presents Georgia, Georgia tackled the question of the treatment of Men in contemporary society. Georgia described herself as an "anti-feminist" and cites several statistics demonstrating Read More
  • "GO F**K YOURSELF!!" Screamed The Tolerant Liberals

    After being snarked at by some gutless hecklers, Alex ruminates on the lack of intellectual honesty when hyperbole replaces frank discussion. Your opinion matters. Please leave a comment bellow. Read More
  • Poll: Is Donald Trump A Racist?

    A racist is a person who believes in the superiority or inferiority of another race. While many point to the President Elect's immigration policies as being racially motivated, others point Read More
  • Michael Moore Makes The Case For Trump?

    An unlikely voice of support, Left Wing documentary film maker and activist Michael Moore's candid explanation of the Trump phenomenon is so spot on, it has been picked up as Read More
  • Charles Freedman's Election 2016 Recommendations

    Candidates President/Vice President: Trump-Pence US Senate: Loretta Sanchez US Representative: Casey Lucius State Senate: Palmer Kain State Assembly: Anna Caballero PVUSD Board area 2: Georgia Acosta Propositions (aptly named...) 51: Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

KSCO Live Show: 831-479-1080 KSCO Office: 831-475-1080

Important! For Dead Doctors Don't Lie Use: 888-379-2552

Saturday Food Chain

Every Saturday morning, from 9 to 10 a.m, join KSCO's Michael Olson for a discussion on local farm and agriculture issues.

Metrofarm.com

 

 

Journalist

Michael Olson produced, wrote and/or photographed feature-length news for a variety of media, including the San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner newspapers, Skiing and Small Space Gardening magazines,NBC, ABC, Australian Broadcast Commission, and KQED Public Television networks. His production and photography helped win a National Emmy nomination for NBC Magazine with David Brinkley. Olson is the author of MetroFarm, the Ben Franklin Book of the Year Finalist and Executive Producer and Host of the syndicated Saturday Food Chain radiotalk show, which received the Ag/News Show of the Year Award from the California Legislature. He recently authored Tales from a Tin Can, which is the oral-history of a World War II US Navy destroyer that earned a Starred Review from Publishers Weekly.

Business Person

Olson designed, blended and packaged a fertilizer for container-grown house and garden plants; certified and registered the product as a “specialty fertilizer” with the State of California; and sold the product to the national lawn and garden market. Olson has over two decades of broadcast media management and, as General Manager of newstalk radio stations KSCO & KOMY in Santa Cruz, California, has helped hundreds of locally-owned businesses compete against national chains. Olson is currently a partner in the MO MultiMedia Group of Santa Cruz, California.

Download File

Food Chain Radio News

Food Chain Radio Michael Olson
Urban Farming Agriculturalist
Sowing Cannabis normalica

What will we reap when we sow Cannabis normalica?
 
Guest:  Erik Altieri, Communications Director, National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML)

We have not seen “normal” since the United States outlawed the plant genus Cannabis in 1937, and then sealed the deal by talking the world’s other governments into signing the Single Convention Treaty of 1961.

In doing so, the United States made a plant that was thoroughly normal  throughout the world into a plant that was not only abnormal, but also illegal, thus leaving the entire world in a state of “reefer madness.”

But wait, that plant the United States made illegal throughout the world is now a legal recreation– at least sort of– in two states, a medicine in 20 states, and was declared to be less-dangerous-than-booze by the former Choom Ganger now President Barack Obama…

No matter how we look at Cannabis, it appears as though the plant is now on its way to becoming normal, in the country that made it abnormal.  This very interesting state of affairs leads us to ask…

What will we reap when we sow Cannabis normalica?

Download File

Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
OF AUTISM, ANIMAL WELFARE & DR. TEMPLE GRANDIN

How should we treat the animals we are to eat?
 
Guest:  Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University

This from the book of Genesis:

And God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness, and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the heavens, and over the cattle, over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.”

And so he did, and so here we are, with all this dominion business to manage.  Given the videos taken at animal processing facilities, its pretty easy to see we have not been doing a very good job with our dominion management, at least with respect to the animals we eat.  What to do?

Dr. Temple Grandin does not read things in the normal sort of way.  She is autistic, and comprehends in pictures instead of words.  This ability allows her to see animal behavior, decode that behavior, and use that understanding of behavior to modify how we handle the animals we are to eat.

Dr. Grandin’s ability to see and comprehend animal behavior, together with the backing of some very big businesses, has allowed her to change how we treat the animals we are to eat, for the betterment of all concerned.  And so we turn to her and ask…

How should we treat the animals we are to eat?

Download File

Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
EATING DISORDERLY

Can one bring an eating disorder back into order?

 
Guest:  Dr. Elizabeth Esalen from the Lotus Collaborative

 


Some of us eat to live.  Others live to eat.  The rest of us have lost control of eating.

In fact, many people throughout the developed world now suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some point in their life. These disorders include anorexia nervosa, binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, or disorders not otherwise specified.

Contrary to what some might think, eating disorders are not a fad or lifestyle choice; they are real, complex, and devastating conditions that have very serious consequences for one’s health and productivity.  The extent to which we in the developed world suffer from eating disorders leads us to ask…

To what extent do we suffer from eating disorders?  Who is most vulnerable to losing control of their eating?  How does one address a loved who has an eating disorder?  How are eating disorders treated?  And…

Can one bring an eating disorder back into order?

Download File

Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
SOIL, FOOD AND FAITH

Can soil and food feed one’s faith?

 
Guest:  Fred Bahnson, Director of the Food, Faith, and Religious Leadership Initiative, and author of Soil and Sacrament

Some time ago, I hosted an edition of the Food Chain Radio program from a federal prison.  The focus of the program was the prison’s horticulture program.

In touring the grounds with the warden, I quickly recognized the prison contained two kinds of inmates:  those who were not part of the horticulture program and those who were.

Those who were not, pumped iron on the prison’s cement-covered exercise yard; those who were, built up the prison’s soil and tended its plants. 

The difference was in the eyes.

Those who were not part of the horticulture program had the look of one  totally present, as one would be if one were a predator or prey in nature.  Eat or be eaten.

Those who were part of the horticulture program had the look of someone not totally there, as if they had somehow tunneled out and escaped.  Free!

In his Soil and Sacrament, Fred Bahnson claims, “Our yearning for real food is inextricably bound up in our spiritual desire to be fed.”  This thought leads us to ask…

Why does religious literature often feature the metaphor of farm and garden?

How does the growth of soil inspire the growth of faith?

Can soil, food, and faith strengthen community?

Download File

Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
OUR OCEAN TRASH PATCHES

Is it possible to throw plastic away?

 
Guest:  Captain Charles Moore, Founder The Algalita Marine Research Institute

Out there in the oceans of the world, where the life we will eat sometime in the future, there exists giant patches of decomposing plastic trash that some say are as big as North America.

In truth, these patches, or gyres, are hard to see by the casual observer, or by satellites high in the sky, as they are made up of tiny nodules of decomposing plastic polymers that grow in size as one approaches the center of the spiraling vortex of currents.

Nevertheless, the patches are huge, and cover large extents of the ocean, and so lead us to ask…

To what extent does plastic trash inhabit our oceans?

Does this decomposing plastic trash find its way back into our food chain?

What can be done, if anything, to ameliorate the damage of our plastic trash?

And finally…

Is it possible to throw trash away?

Download File

Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
OUR OCEAN TRASH PATCHES

Is it possible to throw plastic away?
 
Guest:  Captain Charles Moore, Founder The Algalita Marine Research Institute

Out there in the oceans of the world, where the life we will eat sometime in the future, there exists giant patches of decomposing plastic trash that some say are as big as North America.

In truth, these patches, or gyres, are hard to see by the casual observer, or by satellites high in the sky, as they are made up of tiny nodules of decomposing plastic polymers that grow in size as one approaches the center of the spiraling vortex of currents.
Nevertheless, the patches are huge, and cover large extents of the ocean, and so lead us to ask…
To what extent does plastic trash inhabit our oceans?
Does this decomposing plastic trash find its way back into our food chain?
What can be done, if anything, to ameliorate the damage of our plastic trash?
And finally…

Is it possible to throw trash away?

Download File

Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
THE CROP DUSTER: FLYING IT ON

Are crop dusters now essential to agriculture?
 
Guest:  Bert Atwood, Author of My Father Was A Crop Duster

To succeed in the business of farming, one must, to the extent possible, exert control over elements in the environment, among them nutrients and pests.

When one’s farm is small, as farms tended to be in the distant past, control was exerted by the tools in hand, or by the implements pulled by animals.  As technology progressed, and brought forth new control measures like mechanized tractors and chemical fertilizers and pesticides, farms grew larger, and larger, and larger still.

Today, some farms are measured in the tens of thousands of acres.  To exert control to such an extent, many farmers rely on the services of crop dusters.  For a few dollars per acre, these magnificent men, and women, in their flying machines can stop a threatening fungus, kill noxious weeds, and fertilize a hungry crop. 

In fact, crop dusters now make it possible for one farmer to grow a thousand acres of crops without weeds or pests.  This realization leads us to ask…

Are crop dusters now essential to agriculture?

Download File

SLAYING NATURAL FOOD

Should any food be labeled “Natural”?

Guest:  Stephen Gardner, Director of Litigation Center for Science in the Public Interest

It is a food selling $40 billion a year, but there is really nothing to it but a suggestion that really doesn’t mean anything.

Many of the foods once labeled “Natural,” like Goldfish crackers, Naked juice, and Silk soy drink, are now shedding the label to become, well, whatever is next!

Consider, for example, Silk, a milk-like drink made from soy.  Silk was introduced as an “organic” food in 1996 by the White Wave Company at the Natural Foods Expo in Anaheim.   In 2002, White Wave was purchased by Dean Foods, and by 2005 the organic drink was generating sales in of $350 million a year.  In 2009, Dean switched from organic soybeans to conventional beans, and Organic Silk became Natural Silk.  Today, Silk is just Silk. 

One of the reasons food and drink companies, like Dean, PepsiCo, and Campbell Soup are shedding the natural label is to avoid an avalanche of lawsuits alleging false advertising.  According to a recent post in the Wall Street Journal, at least 100 lawsuits have been filed in the past two years “challenging the natural claims of Unilever PLC’s Ben & Jerry’s, Kellog Co.’s Kashi, Beam Inc.’s Skinnygirl alcohol drinks and dozens of other brands.

These lawsuits lead us to ask…

Why do consumers spend $40 billion a year on the suggestion of natural? 

Why are some trying to litigate foods labeled natural off the shelf?

KSCO Newsletter

Your Email:

We do not share your email with third parties.

×

KSCO Newsletter

Your Email:

We do not share your email with third parties.