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FARMER ASSURANCE PROVISION /
MONSANTO PROTECTION ACT


Food Chain Radio Show #924 • June 15, 2013 • Sat 9AM Pacific

Michael Olson hosts: Terry Wanzek, Farmer & North Dakota Senator

They say there are two sides to every story, and that is most certainly true when it comes to the story about the genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, in our food chain.

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There is the side of producers, and there is the side of consumers.

For producers, the technology of genetic engineering has made the job of growing food much easier.  Before GMOs, a farmer had to go out into the fields to cull weeds and pests by hand and machine.  With GMOs, crops can be sprayed with herbicides and infused with pesticides, and thus one farmer can now grow thousands of acres of crops with no weeds or pests.

To protect this transformative technology, biotech agriculture lobbied government for a “Farmer Assurance Provision” that would allow their GMOs to be planted anywhere at anytime without interference from laws or courts.

For a significant number of consumers, there is uncertainty with respect to the efficacy of eating foods that have been saturated in herbicides and infused with pesticides, and they have taken to calling that government Provision the “Monsanto Protection Act.”

Two sides of the story: Farmer Assurance Provision or Mansanto Protection Act.”

And so we ask…

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What does agriculture hope to accomplish with its Farmer Assurance Provision?  Why do many call the Farmer Assurance Provision the Monsanto Protection Act?  And…
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What’s to eat in the Monsanto Protection Act?

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Food Chain Weekly News Topic
TO TEST, OR NOT TO TEST,    ORGANIC FOOD

Food Chain Radio Show #923 • June 8, 2013 • Sat 9AM Pacific
Michael Olson hosts: Mischa Popoff, Author Is It Organic

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Are all foods labeled “organic” organic?

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File this under Michael Olson’s Third Law of the Food Chain:  The farther we go from the source of our food, the less control we have over what’s in our food.

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On average, the food we eat now travels well over a thousand miles from where it was grown.   As a consequence of this distance, we are losing track of who is growing our food, and how they are growing it.  One way to regain some control over the food we eat is to buy food that displays the “Certified Organic” label.

The organic food industry is expected to grow from $60 billion today to $105 billion in 2015 on our desire to buy food that is clean and wholesome.

Foods that have been certified “organic” are to be grown and processed without synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, and to not contain genetically-modified organisms or GMOs.  At least, that is what we want to believe, and what industry wants us to believe, but is it true?

Are all foods labeled “organic” organic?

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Food Chain Weekly News Topic
GOING TO GROUND

Food Chain Radio Show #922
June 1, 2013 • Sat 9AM Pacific

Michael Olson hosts:   Judith Schwartz, Author

Cows Save the Planet: And Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth



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Can livestock be managed to restore soil?
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“An apple a day keeps the doctor away!”

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This advice may have worked eighty years ago, but that apple has since lost about 50% of its calcium and over 80% of its phosphorus, iron, and magnesium.  To keep the doctor away today, we must now eat about five apples a day!

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What happened to the food in our food?

There are two ways to grow a plant:  One way, which we have come to call the “organic” way, is to feed the soil with life, and then to allow for the decomposition of that life in the soil to feed the plant.  The other way, which might be called the “synthetic” way, is to bypass the soil and feed the plant directly with synthesized nutrients.

Most of our food is now produced the synthetic way, on an industrial scale.  As a consequence, the role soil plays in the production of food is different than it was 80 years ago.  Where soil was the source of nutrients, it is now an inert medium through which plants can be fed nutrients.

This synthetic technology has given us a great amount of control over the production of our food, and has allowed for the industrial scale with which we now grow our food.  With control, however, comes responsibility.  We are now responsible for providing all the nutrition plants need.  If we fail to do so, plants will not provide us with all the nutrition we need.

Who among us is smart enough to know which nutrients plants need, in what quantity, and at what time?  We do our best, but given the nutritional quality of our apple, and the state of our health, it would seem as though we should be going to ground.  And so we ask…

Can livestock be managed to restore our soil?

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Comment (0) Hits: 405

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