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Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
EATING DISORDERLY

Can one bring an eating disorder back into order?

 
Guest:  Dr. Elizabeth Esalen from the Lotus Collaborative

 


Some of us eat to live.  Others live to eat.  The rest of us have lost control of eating.

In fact, many people throughout the developed world now suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some point in their life. These disorders include anorexia nervosa, binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, or disorders not otherwise specified.

Contrary to what some might think, eating disorders are not a fad or lifestyle choice; they are real, complex, and devastating conditions that have very serious consequences for one’s health and productivity.  The extent to which we in the developed world suffer from eating disorders leads us to ask…

To what extent do we suffer from eating disorders?  Who is most vulnerable to losing control of their eating?  How does one address a loved who has an eating disorder?  How are eating disorders treated?  And…

Can one bring an eating disorder back into order?

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Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
SOIL, FOOD AND FAITH

Can soil and food feed one’s faith?

 
Guest:  Fred Bahnson, Director of the Food, Faith, and Religious Leadership Initiative, and author of Soil and Sacrament

Some time ago, I hosted an edition of the Food Chain Radio program from a federal prison.  The focus of the program was the prison’s horticulture program.

In touring the grounds with the warden, I quickly recognized the prison contained two kinds of inmates:  those who were not part of the horticulture program and those who were.

Those who were not, pumped iron on the prison’s cement-covered exercise yard; those who were, built up the prison’s soil and tended its plants. 

The difference was in the eyes.

Those who were not part of the horticulture program had the look of one  totally present, as one would be if one were a predator or prey in nature.  Eat or be eaten.

Those who were part of the horticulture program had the look of someone not totally there, as if they had somehow tunneled out and escaped.  Free!

In his Soil and Sacrament, Fred Bahnson claims, “Our yearning for real food is inextricably bound up in our spiritual desire to be fed.”  This thought leads us to ask…

Why does religious literature often feature the metaphor of farm and garden?

How does the growth of soil inspire the growth of faith?

Can soil, food, and faith strengthen community?

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Food Chain Radio News
            Food Chain Radio Host Michael Olson
            Urban Farming Agriculturalist
OUR OCEAN TRASH PATCHES

Is it possible to throw plastic away?

 
Guest:  Captain Charles Moore, Founder The Algalita Marine Research Institute

Out there in the oceans of the world, where the life we will eat sometime in the future, there exists giant patches of decomposing plastic trash that some say are as big as North America.

In truth, these patches, or gyres, are hard to see by the casual observer, or by satellites high in the sky, as they are made up of tiny nodules of decomposing plastic polymers that grow in size as one approaches the center of the spiraling vortex of currents.

Nevertheless, the patches are huge, and cover large extents of the ocean, and so lead us to ask…

To what extent does plastic trash inhabit our oceans?

Does this decomposing plastic trash find its way back into our food chain?

What can be done, if anything, to ameliorate the damage of our plastic trash?

And finally…

Is it possible to throw trash away?

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